Dr Hauschka Shower Cream now comes in packaging made from recycled plastic milk bottles

dr hauschka shower cream recycled packaging

This new Dr Hauschka Shower Cream comes in innovative sustainable packaging, made from PCR (post-consumer recycled) material, which includes plastic milk bottles. This apparently has saved over 65% of raw oil normally used to make conventional plastic tubes.

The shower cream has a gorgeously soft, creamy texture and an instantly uplifting lemon and lemongrass scent (developed by an in-house perfumer).  I’ve been told the shower cream can also double up as a facial cleanser as it has anti-microbial properties. A pea-sized amount is all you need.

Here’s a mini Q&A with Tara O’Rourke, Dr. Hauschka’s brand trainer and expert who explains more about the recycled packaging and Dr Hauschka’s approach to sustainability:

Continue reading “Dr Hauschka Shower Cream now comes in packaging made from recycled plastic milk bottles”

7 reasons why I gave up freelance life for a full-time role

hustling for work freelance vs fulltime

After ten years of freelance life as a writer and online editor for national press I decided to go in-house, full time and permanent. A big move. But it was a decision I’d been contemplating for perhaps 18 months or so, and finally the right job came along, as commercial editor at Hearst.

People usually do it the other way around – they’ll spend years grinding away at the 9-5 and finally release themselves to new and more flexibility ways of working through a freelance role. For me it was the opposite.

I’d spent years carving an amazing freelance career that worked with my passions in health, beauty, fitness and wellness. I’d worked my way up from beauty writer/assistant to web editor and digital director and eventually set up my own digital consultancy advising small to medium brands on digital and social media projects.

I had freedom, flexibility, fun, countless perks and great contacts but I knew it was time to switch. Here’s why…..

✨I wanted a new challenge

After years of establishing myself within health, beauty and wellness I didn’t want my next move to be too far away from these subjects that I loved. But I needed an environment that would open up new learning opportunities.

That’s one of my rules of thumb on deciding whether to stay or move on: is there more to learn or have I reached a plateau? I definitely felt like I’d reached a plateau with the type of work and contract roles I was getting.

I’ve always been good at forging new paths or diversifying my skills but this time I knew the next role wouldn’t be wildly different or teach me anything significantly new. There was nothing wrong with those roles but it wasn’t a path that would help me grow personally or professionally.

📈I wanted to future-proof my career

Over the course of a decade I became quite adept at reflecting on where I was professionally and find ways to keep opportunities flowing. Branching out and diversifying into digital and commercial work (I originally started out on print editorial) definitely helped make freelance life more successful as I had my fingers in lots of different pies, but this time I needed a bigger change.

I took a mental snapshot five years into the future and knew I had to future-proof my career. One option was to grow my freelance business into a bigger brand but I knew this wasn’t a direction I was interested in. The other option was to fill in gaps in my CV to ensure I had a whole spectrum of professional experience to take me into the future. I had plenty of experience working with start-ups (mainly in the beauty industry) but I had no work history with larger corporates so I kind of knew what I had to do.

✋🏽I wanted to stop hustling for work

This point was part of my five-year vision into the future. Did I still want to be looking for contract work every 12-18 months? No. And how did I feel about doing more editorial, which I loved, but with rates so low they can barely pay a mortgage? Definitely wasn’t keen on that. So I no longer wanted to hustle.

💵I wanted HR and payroll

I’d had my fair share of chasing invoices big and small. Late payments or at worse, no pay, was definitely something I was happy to leave behind in return for a guaranteed drop of money into my account each month, no pleading needed.

🤓 I wanted processes and systems

Seems like an odd thing to want but after years of free, fluid and organic ways of working I actually just wanted a good process to follow. At the time I loved the ad-hoc working style adopted by small organisations and start-ups and for a long time this work culture really suited me, but eventually I started craving structure and organisation. I simply wanted to learn more organised and more efficient ways of doing things.

👫I wanted to work with more senior people

I was often the most senior person on a team, sharing my digital skills and experiences with others and for several years I loved doing this. I enjoyed training up junior staff and writing strategy documents and toolkits for brands and PRs but I reached a point where I knew I had to learn more myself.

I wanted to be in an environment where there were people more senior than me to learn from. I’m slightly obsessed with learning so this was a big pull.

💥I wanted to work on bigger projects

Small organisations usually means small budgets. I had plenty of ideas and creative solutions but the issue of limited resources would always hold us back. For years this didn’t bother me but eventually I wanted to work on bigger brands and bigger budgets, not just for the kudos and clout but to challenge my thinking and ways of working.


Essentially what all of these points boil down to is a need to keep learning, growing and evolving, as a person and in my career, which is pretty much essential for work survival (and in general life!).

I wouldn’t change a single thing from my years as a freelancer – even the trials and struggles, especially in the beginning years, all lead to an accumulation of valuable experience.

Eight months in, I’m still super happy in my role at Hearst – I’m commercial editor for Women’s Health, Runner’s World and other titles – as I take on all the amazing health and fitness branded campaigns, from Nike and New Balance to Imodium and Deep Freeze. It brings together all my interests and professional skills and gives me the large scale experience I was so keen to find.

I’m not as restricted as I imagined I would be either, as our projects and campaigns change so regularly and each one is entirely different; plus we have the capacity to be as creative as we want. A dream set up.

So it was totally worth holding out for the right role in the end!

 

My 8 favourite cookbooks for healthy vegan and vegetarian cooking

fresh india cookbook best vegetarian

I love a good cookbook. I have over 35-40 of them – bought, inherited or gratefully received. A few have proven their worth and have become absolute favourites. They’re the ones I can always rely on to provide me a new or interesting way of cooking with an ingredient. Or offer an inspiring recipe I can pull together with minimum effort and with simple foods I usually already have.

Friends often ask if I can recommend a good book and there are a few I always call out, which I’ve listed here. Each one is best for a different reason, occasion or cooking style. So if you’re looking to renew your repertoire of recipes or need fresh inspiration for healthy, plant-based cooking (that’s still hearty and filling!) then this is the list for you. Feel free to pass it on.

1. World Food Cafe Vegetarian Bible

By Chris and Carolyn caldicott

And it really is a bible. If you’re excited by the variety and flavours of world cuisine you will love this. Organised by region, the authors have cherrypicked recipes that show off the best from that area. I usually turn to this book when I’m looking for a curry, going straight to the index to see the options for my chosen veg (which is how I use most cookbooks) and then I can almost guarantee the dish I find in here wouldn’t be in any other cookbook.

Best for: interesting DISHES from FAR AND WIDE

2. The Happy Pear

by David and Stephen Flynn

This was a gift from a good friend and very quickly became a regular go-to. I’m quite averse to vegan food that’s light or superficial, inadvertently channeling the notion that vegans are not hearty eaters (which is far from the truth, in my case anyway!). The Flynn brothers have taken everyday, popular ingredients such as squash and lentils and not only given them fuss-free makeovers but the recipes are sure to fill you up too. There’s not a drop of pretentious cooking here, just down to earth, wholesome meals that are both inviting and easy to follow.

BEST FOR: keeping the family full and happy

 

3. Fresh India

by Meera Sodha

I received this as a birthday present from another good friend only a few months ago and it’s been the most exciting edition to my collection. I made three recipes within the first few days of receiving it and instantly bookmarked so many more to try. Possibly because I’m obsessed with vegetarian Indian cuisine – you’ll find me at one of London’s local pure vegetarian restaurants feasting on dosa, idly and vada at any possible opportunity – that I was smitten by this book but also because Meera Sodha makes everything so simple. For example, I’ve picked up lots of new (and uncomplicated) ways of cooking Indian-inspired sauces and I found it super easy to take ingredients from one recipe and combine with the method of another, depending on what I have in the kitchen.

Best for: being creative with Indian cooking with hardly any effort

 

 

4. The Nut Butter Cookbook by Pip & Nut

By Pippa Murray

This book isn’t vegetarian or vegan (in fact, apart from the nut butters there’s hardly any vegan recipes) but I have easily adapted ideas and replaced dairy ingredients with non-dairy alternatives. The highlight for me is the Peanut Sweet Potato Gratin – once I’d swapped the cream and milk for coconut milk, it was divine.  I have also discovered super easy ways to turn nut butter into sauces, dips and dressings which has transformed my lunches and dinners. I now make peanut and sriracha sauce almost daily!

Best for: surprisingLy endless ways with nut butter


5. Silk Road Vegetarian

by Dahlia Abraham-Klein

This one was a bit of a wild card which I bought after a recommendation from my uncle, who also loves vegetarian cooking, and despite its slightly old fashioned imagery it’s definitely proven itself. Covering a region I’m naturally drawn thanks to my Iraqi heritage, I often reach for this when I want comfort food inspiration. It’s great for stews and rice dishes.

Best for: traditional cuisine that’s true to its origins

 

6. Cook, Share, Eat Vegan

by Aine Carlin

Who would have thought that one day there would be as many modern vegan cookbooks as there are out today. Bookshops and bookshelves are bursting with them all vying for our attention but it’s hard to see which ones are really worth having. Having eaten a vegan diet for over a decade now (way back when veganism was still very hippie) I feel like my plant-based cooking skills constantly needs challenging and refreshing which is why Aine Carlin’s collections appeal. If you’re looking for the next step up in plant-based cooking I’d definitely recommend this. The ideas go the extra mile to impress but still accessible and easy to make.     

Best for: Impressing guests (but not leaving them hungry)

 

 

7. Riverford Companion: Autumn Winter and Spring Summer

By GuyWatson

I’m a regular customer of Riverford veg delivery boxes (I’ve tried other veg boxes over the years but always come back to Riverford for the variety and generous portion sizes) so it’s no surprise I also love their cookbooks, thoughtfully presented for seasonal cooking. Guy Watson and the Riverford team never fail to reveal a new or enlivening way to prep or cook a vegetable, banishing boredom and educating with their decades of expertise along the way.

Best for: never being stuck with what to do with a vegetable again

 

8. The Dal Cookbook

By Krishna Dutta

An oldie but a goodie. I have no idea how this one entered my life (another gift maybe?) but for lovers of dal (obviously) it’s a must-have. From simple to elaborate and all styles and flavours in between, this is a chance to experiment with over 50 ways to find your favourites. It’s also a bit of a reference book for all things lentil-based, another reason why it’s stood the test of time on my bookshelf.

Best for: Never cooking the same dal twice

 

Would love to hear what your go-to veggie/vegan cookbooks are! Thanks for reading :)

Whoop! Best Blog for Green/Eco Living

Cooperative-Energy-logo

Cooperative-Energy-logo-best eco blogs

Thrilled to hear my humble little Brighter Shade of Green blog has been chosen by Cooperative Energy as one of the top 5 blogs to ‘help you stick to your green goals in 2016’. Thank you Coop Energy!

They had these lovely words to say:

“If you’re tired of being lectured on global warming and rising sea levels, why not cast your eyes over Yanar’s green living blog, A Brighter Shade of Green. Offering a different perspective on sustainable lifestyle choices, Yanar offers her thoughts on decluttering her home, fashion made from recycled car parts and whether it’s actually worth buying eco-friendly cleaning products. If you want to go green but feel talking about climate change is all doom and gloom, Yanar’s optimistic and engaging posts could help you stick to a few green goals this year.”

top 5 blog for greener living

Check out the rest of the top 5 for eco blogging at cooperativeenergy.coop – I’m in pretty good company!

Thanks again Coop Energy x