14 Reasons Why I Decided to Do a Personal Trainer Course

no1 fitness education pt course

I started my career as a beauty and wellness writer for print and online magazines but fitness has always been part of my life, ever since early school years. So it feels fitting to be on a personal trainer course now, a Level 3 qualification with No.1 Fitness Education (one of the leading providers in the industry), which I’m so excited about.

I’m currently two weeks into the course, so here’s why I decided to do it and the journey that brought me here… Maybe it’ll inspire you, too.

I started young… I remember going to the library aged 13 and getting books out on diet and fitness – one was on food combining (it was all the rage in the 80s) and another on callisthenics (another 80s throwback). I ran and did athletics for my school and, after a boozy stint at university, I started running again and doing races in my mid 20s and early 30s. I spent the next ten years dedicated to running, marathons and track training, all of which I loved.

The fitness journey took a new turn… Then I started CrossFit in my mid-30s after meeting another editor who looked super strong, lean and fit. I discovered a whole new way of training and learnt how to move my body in new and better ways. I gradually started building total body strength, something I’d not considered enough before, and this helped me become a much stronger runner, too.

I learnt new skills… What I loved most, though, was learning the new skills in Olympic lifting and gymnastics, which is part of CrossFit, as this engaged me mentally not just physically. There was also all the functional training (that other gyms do, too), that help future-proof your body for everyday life.

Things got serious… What started off as a twice weekly workout is now, five years later, a full time hobby; Last year I did two weightlifting competitions and I’m training for my third. I also do the occasional CrossFit comp. I train six days a week (three-four specifically for Olympic lifts and two CrossFit) and I’ve learnt so much about mind and body strength. You can read more about my weightlifting journey here.

My mindset changed too… What’s also changed is that I no longer kill myself with cardio to keep my weight down, but train for strength and performance goals instead. I’ve found the strong, lean body is a happy by-product of that and it’s 100% changed my mindset into something a lot healthier (and happier).

It was all about goals… There’s nothing wrong with aesthetic goals, and I’ve certainly had them in the past, but in my experience I’ve found working towards challenge or physical goals (like an 80kg back squat or doing pull-ups) is more meaningful and I’m more likely to stick to them, almost effortlessly.

The right expertise is inspiring… All of these experiences have helped me gain a deeper understanding of the training world, what real athlete training is like, and it’s introduced me to some amazing coaches and trainers, whose wisdom has inspired me endlessly. I’m hoping all of this will be genuinely valuable in my own PT training. Last year, I was inspired (mainly by others around me) to take my British Weightlifting Level 1 course; you can read my review here.

My 9 – 5 will benefit… I’m lucky for health and fitness to be part of my job and career and while I’m not planning to pack up my job at Women’s Health, Men’s Health, NetDoctor and Runner’s World at Hearst, this qualification will simply feed into my work as a health and fitness editor there.

I create commercial content for clients ranging from Nike and adidas to Deep Heat and Imodium across print, digital, video and social, and fitness features heavily in this. Whether I’m shooting a workout video or interviewing experts, having a formal training in fitness will amplify my work and give me more credibility as an editor.

Being qualified matters outside of work, too… I know I won’t be any kind of expert overnight but having a formal qualification is so important when it comes to sharing content or advice on my own channels and circles. These days people are too easily self-appointed experts without the right backing, so having credentials from somewhere reputable (another important difference) makes a huge difference.

I might have clients one day… Just because I have no plans to leave my job and become a full-time PT doesn’t mean I can’t be open to possibilities of having PT clients in the future. I absolutely love sharing knowledge, experiences and inspiration so it seems fitting that I might have a client or two one day. In the meantime, I’ll be using my knowledge as an editor.

Choosing the right course is important… Finding an education provider for any kind of course is without a doubt, a minefield. There are so many options, and so many shortcuts. PT or yoga teacher training in four weeks online, without ever having to train a real human? Sure, that’s possible. But how good a professional will you be in the real world?

I choose No.1 Fitness as they came highly recommended from several people I know and their 10-year reputation in the industry is strong. Secondly, they’re one of the only remaining educators with classroom teaching; others have moved entirely online, which seems wrong for something so practical and physical.

It’s comprehensive… My Level 3 course involves a group learning session every Saturday for 12 weeks and on-going e-learning (mainly anatomy) that’s done in your own time throughout. The weekly group sessions are mixture of classroom and gym floor where we are shown how to use and instruct the gym resistance machines, cardio machines, free weights, dynamic stretches and five barbell lifts: deadlift, squat, bench press, overhead press and barbell row. Other providers may not have this level of real-life coaching so we’re so so lucky to have this.

There’s real pride… It’s not just the face to face structure I like but the calibre of the teachers and trainers leading each session is impressive, each one a leader in their field and proud to be working with No.1. There’s also a huge focus, communicated from day one, that this course (unlike others) prepares you fully for the realities of working in the fitness industry, whichever path you choose to take. All the trainers are highly connected and come with decades of experiences and backstories so they are keen to guide, advice and help as much as possible.

I’m obviously excited… having spent most of last year thinking about doing this, I’m so pleased I’ve actually made it happen. I’m the kind of person slightly obsessed with learning and growth anyway, so progressing in an area I’m already passionate about makes it even more valuable and worthwhile; I’m even enjoying the anatomy (although I’ll admit it’s not easy trying to remember it!). I’m looking forward to more knowledge over the next 12 weeks and then finally waving a bit of paper and shouting out that I’m a qualified PT.

If you fancy finding out more about the fitness instructor and personal trainer courses at No.1 Fitness check them out at no1fitnesseducation.co.uk and @no1fitnesseducation

Fitness news: Roar fitness opens new luxury London gym for more amazing body transformations


If you’re familiar with Roar fitness on Instagram you’ll know it’s famous for its jaw-dropping body transformations. The first branch opened three years ago in the City and this week I visited the brand new, sparkling second branch, also City-based, and was super lucky to have a training session with its co-founder Sarah Lindsay @roarfitnessgirl.

Sarah was previously a three-time Olympic speed skater and the British Ladies Champion for nine consecutive years. She talks about fitness and how to achieve certain goals in great detail and with a lot of passion, which I loved. She runs Roar with her now-husband Rich Phillips, also famed for his personal training expertise.

The goal at Roar Fitness? To achieve fat loss and body transformation goals through weight-training three times a week with a personal trainer, and a bespoke nutrition plan. As simple as that.

Clients now include countless celebrities and anyone committed to transforming body and mind. What I also liked about the set up is each bespoke programme begins with the physiotherapist, who assesses your body’s needs, strengths and weaknesses so the fitness program is then built in line with this.

If you’re terrified of lifting or never considered strength training as the secret to losing weight (which it is), then Roar Fitness will speak to you. It’s humbling to hear Sarah admit she’s been surprised how body transformations have changed the minds and emotions of the women she’s trained, not just their bodies. More confidence, greater positivity and a healthier, happier approach to life are all by-products of getting fitter and stronger. Fact.

Here’s a clip of my workout with Sarah at the new luxury gym in Eastcheap, London. I don’t normally train with machines so I really enjoyed being pushed out of my comfort zone with new moves and equipment.

Find out more at roar-fitness.com/

Review: British Weightlifting Level 1 in Coaching

Getting my British Weightlifting (BWL) Level 1 Award in Coaching was not something I ever expected to do. In fact, when one of my friends Sophia Smith suggested joining her course earlier this year, I immediately thought no, I’m not experienced enough.

But, through a coincidental twist of events a few months later, I was invited by BWL itself (the UK governing body) to attend the course at Third Space in Canary Wharf. Spoiler: I found it really useful, had a great time, and passed!

I’m now so pleased to have done it as it’s been so useful and relevant for my training. So even if, like me, you have no plans or intention to coach, you’re still likely to get something out of it.  

Here’s what the course was like, what I learnt and what you need to know if you’re considering it, or if you’re just intrigued to find out more. Maybe you can surprise yourself by getting qualified too.

British Weightlifting  Level 1 in Coaching review

What is BWL Level 1?

A two-day face to face course in a small group environment with highly experienced Olympic lifting coaches alongside comprehensive e-learning modules.

It’s an opportunity to build your knowledge of the two Olympic lifts: the snatch and the clean & jerk, and learn how to apply that knowledge to a class and coaching setting. You’ll also go through supporting lifts such as back squat and front squat.

The Level 1 qualifies you to assist a more experienced coach who is already qualified at Level 2 or higher. 

Who is it for?

You don’t need to be a coach or PT to do this course, in fact it’s designed for people with no coaching experience.

Experience in the lifts isn’t even a prerequisite although it’s advisable. (I couldn’t imagine attending a course to learn how to coach the snatch if you’ve never snatched before.) 

You’ll be introduced to the principles behind how a weightlifting class is put together, how to deliver it so students are safe and how to evaluate the outcomes and experiences. 

Even if you don’t plan to become a coach, it’s a great opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the lifts, which will help in training and progressing. 

What we learnt

>> The key components and cues for each of the three Olympic lifts – the snatch, clean and jerk – as well as accessory lifts such as back squat and front squat.

>> How to teach with minimal talking time – turns out coaching isn’t a continuous stream of instructions. You have to master the art of observation followed by selective, efficient and concise language to cue only the most important thing so not to overwhelm or confuse the student. Less is more.

>> How to plan, deliver and evaluate a weightlifting class and how to effectively assist more qualified coaches (level 2 and above).

>> We even learnt non-verbal instruction eg for the hard of hearing, which was an interesting twist.

>> We had access to the e-learning hub with lots of great video tutorials. The hub also covered off: roles and responsibilities of a coach, safety in the sport, basic rules of the sport, technicalities of the lifts and supporting exercises.

Few things that pleasantly surprised me

I have no sports coaching experience but I didn’t feel out of my depth. I think the years doing these lifts in a group and one to one setting have meant I’m familiar with the cues and instructions, which definitely helped me absorb and apply all the information received. 

Don’t be scared of the assessment – everyone wants you to do well so there’s lots of practice and the teacher breaks down each element so you’re fully prepared. At the end of day one the thought of being assessed the next day felt terrifying and daunting but once you get there it’s actually totally doable and ok.

You don’t need to worry about being perfect at the moves yourself. The most important thing is understand the key points and safety cues and this will help better your understanding of them.

I started applying the knowledge straight away – in the training sessions immediately after the course. I’m now so aware of my positioning and movement through the lifts and mentally use the cues I learnt every time I lift, which is great, a testament to how useful the course was.

Before you book…

Even though it’s not a prerequisite, knowing the moves will help. As mentioned, you don’t have to be a pro Olympic lifter but at least know what a snatch and clean and jerk  is and have some experience of them.

Allocate some time before the course starts to do the pre course e-learning. You’ll need at least two or three evenings to work through it without rushing. 

Don’t make plans on the night after day one as you’ll have day two’s assessment to prepare for. There’s a lot to take in so it’s not worth rushing, panicking and not feeling prepared for the assessment.


If you think this could be for you, let me know! A limited number of exclusive discount codes are available through me, so message for details if you’re keen.

Are your long runs making you fat?

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Next weekend I’m running London Marathon, which I’m really looking forward to. It will be my third marathon but my first in London (Brighton and Edinburgh previously). I had never planned to run but was offered a last minute place by Lucozade Sport via Health & Fitness magazine who I write for, and seeing as London is so difficult to get into (oversubscribed ballot entry and expensive charity places) of course I said yes quicker than I can send the email reply. But I had just under three months to train so it’s been tight to say the least – a bit like cramming before a huge exam.

Interestingly, a year and a half of weight training and CrossFit has made me stronger than I was for my previous marathons so I’ve been able to tackle the long distances without too much risk of injury. All those deadlifts have luckily come in handy!

But long steady runs have had a surprising effect on my body. At the start of the training when I was building up from eight, nine miles to 15 and more I got leaner and noticed some excess weight fall off pretty quickly. However, during the weeks where I was running 18, 19, 20 and 21 miles I noticed things change – I was no longer feeling light or lean but quite the contrary, I felt like I’d filled out a bit despite doing big mileage every weekend.

I’d cut back on CrossFit (from four sessions a week to three) but I didn’t think that was the cause. Could I be imagining it? A quick step on the weights at my parent’s house confirmed I was right as I’d gone up a kilo but endurance training requires good fuel so I put it down to the extra calories I’d been consuming.

Turns out there’s more to it than that. When I saw my sports massage therapist – the brilliant Uju Eze, who is actually a movement specialist because she’s definitely more than just a sports masseuse – she confirmed there is science behind the gain.

“When you run at around 65% of your maximum heart rate for a long, sustained period the body goes into a catabolic state (muscle-wasting) which means it adapts and starts to store fat and use muscle as as fuel instead because it thinks something is wrong and it needs to get ready to survive.”

This, and a number of other reasons are why low intensity steady cardio (otherwise known as LISS which is the opposite of HIIT – high intensity interval training) can actually be the wrong choice of exercise if fat loss is your goal. Here are a few reasons why the body is not in a fat burning state:

  • the body adapts to low intensity steady state cardio and eventually doesn’t need as much oxygen or energy to do the workout so it becomes easier and consequently less effective. To keep reaping benefits you’d have to increase the intensity e.g. by either training faster or increasing distance.
  • Increasing volume however, could have a detrimental effect in the long run because of a loss of muscle mass (the catabolic effect) which in turn leads to fewer calories burned by the body at rest (the metabolic rate) because muscle burns more calories than fat, and if there’s no change in diet it will eventually lead to fat gain.
  • too much cardio can also lead to increased hunger and additionally, fuelling for long runs can often involve high glycemic foods before, during and after the workout which actually suppress fat loss and fat burn.
  • long steady state cardio only burns calories during the activity rather and doesn’t change your metabolism. To make changes to your metabolism and experience calories burn up to 24 hours after exercise, studies show HIIT training works because it produces mitochondria (cells where respiration happens) and increases mitochondria activity so your body increases its oxidative capacity.

So it wasn’t all in my head, I was indeed actually holding onto weight. There are more explanations and studies shared about this in this article, Does Cardio Make You Fat and following that, check out this article which compares HIIT vs LISS and explains why high intensity interval training is a better option for fat loss and toning up than low state cardio.

I’m now looking forward to the end of this marathon when I can go back to short, sharp and strength based interval training. However, research shows that some steady state cardio can be good as a means of recovery from high intensity strength training so I won’t be giving up on the steady state cardio just yet – it just won’t be as long as it is now.

And I almost forgot! For those friends and family wishing to donate here’s my marathon Just Giving page which a friend kindly set up for me. Even though I don’t have to raise any money for my entry we thought it was only fair to put a few pounds in the pot as a show of gratitude for my place – I’ll be donating to Parkinson’s UK. Thanks all!

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